Welcome

Hello fellow book bloggers and welcome to my blog CaughtWithABook. If you didn’t get it from the title, this blog is going to be about all things bookish. I have always had a great love of reading and being able to dive into a book and be transported into another world and I guess I can also do that with this blog, whilst also sharing my love, my thoughts and so on about everything.

Some of the things I will be hopefully including in this blog, now and in the future, are going to be; Book Reviews, Book Hauls, Tags, Discussions and so on. If these are things that you think you’ll be interested in, then please follow me and let me know if there is anything else you think I should be doing on my blog that I haven’t mentioned. I have included in more details a page “About Me” if you click on About on the Home page, which also includes contact information, if you need it.

This is just a short little welcome and introduction post and to say thank you for hopefully welcoming me once again into the wonderful world of the Book Blogging Community. Thank you and I hope to be posting more soon 🙂

Katina – Roald Dahl (1/27)

This is the first short story in Volume One of Roald Dahlia Complete Short Stories. This book has twenty-seven short stories and I want to post a review for each individual one, that way I can give each one their due credit.

Katina is the first story in this collection, that have been put together in one place for fans of the amazing Roald Dahl. Katina was first published in Ladies’ Home Journal in March 1944, and it’s nice to see these little facts included.

Katina is the name of the little girl that is found alive among the rumble and dead bodies of 1944 war time (I’m guessing by the date this was written). She seems so out of place and she doesn’t speak English or the language of the soldiers. The little girl in the story resembles, for me, a little bit of light, or a distraction to the story and for the soldiers, among all the darkness, cruelty, death and bitterness that comes with war. She’s found amount such brutality and seems so out of place. So innocent.

I am not somebody who likes reading war stories, but knowing that Roald Dahl spent time in the war, you can really feel the truth in his words from his own vivid experiences in the words you’re reading. The descriptions and the writing is so vivid and expressive, you can imagine it all and feel it all. Then when the ending comes, you feel every word of it. It hits you and it’s so real, with no punches held back, just like war. You don’t get to decide the perfect ending, who lives or dies, you have to accept what happens, no matter how it makes you feel.

For a brief short story, it was unexpected, especially coming from Roald Dahl, when you’re used to reading about Everlasting Gobstoppers and made up fun children stories.

I am excited to read the rest of his short stories in this collection. . .

Murder In Little Shendon – A. H. Richardson

I received a free signed first edition copy of this book from the author and publicist in exchange for an honest and unbiased review of this edition.

A murder takes place in the small little village of Shendon. There is something that you should know about his murder that will make solving this crime just that little bit harder for the police trying to solve this murder; nobody liked the victim. This leave practically everyone in “Little Shendon” has a suspect, including the two tourists who are only visiting the town.

It was this concept that I loved when I was approached about reading and reviewing this book. I love murder mysteries. The joy of trying to solve and uncover the killer before they’re revealed. The adrenaline. I love it, and the fact that this book had so many possible killers with so many possible motives, giving more back stories as we were going along, just added to it all. The way that the plot was brought together, all lined up perfectly and I didn’t see it coming. I love it when a book takes me completely by surprise and I haven’t been able to guess the ending, the killer and so on. Then, when looking back on hindsight, you kick yourself not seeing how you didn’t see it coming.

My copy was only 248 pages long and for a book that wasn’t that long, there were a little too many characters introduced into this book. They weren’t all able to stay with me and I wasn’t able to remember each of them specifically, which was disappointing because I felt like I wasn’t giving them each their due respect. I know that this is meant to represent a small village, but some of the characters, including the main ones, just got lost for me possibly because of the vast amount of other characters. But, if you were to take out and reduce some of the characters, or spend some extra time building up and introducing the main characters, possibly making this book about 50 pages longer minimum, there would have been time for there to have been some great character development.

There were some editing mistakes in the copy that I received, that were present in the entirety of the book. Simple things like missing speak bubbles, simple spelling mistakes and other things, that over time did start to annoy me. There is one in particular spelling mistake that does stick out for me as it was then emphasised further by being put into italics. But when an author is so close with their work, things like these are often missed and it is understandable.

Each chapter has their own title name, which gives you a little hint at to what each chapter is going to be about. This could be a little temptation if you were going to end on that chapter, or, if you want to have a little flip through and see what Chapter the killer is going to be revealed in. Not that you would read that Chapter before it’s time, of course, but it’s still nice knowing how long you have left until all is revealed. I will admit though that this story did drag a little bit for me and I was tempted to skip to that chapter entitled “And the killer is…” Maybe it was because I was nowhere near guessing who the killer was and wanted to know who it the murder was.

So, I did enjoy the story, but it could have done with being longer to have developed more of the characters. I defiantly like the idea and the concept behind it and would have loved a whole Murder on the Orient Express ending, that’s here my head was going when I was reading the book. I loved that idea. How it was all brought together in the end was so good and clever and I’m gutted I that I missed it. I wish I could’ve rated it higher, but I’m defiantly giving it a strong 3 stars out of 5!

3 Stars

The Little Voice – Joss Sheldon

This was a different kind of read to what I am regularly used to reading. This is the story of Yew and it is told from his characters perspective, which made this story so much more real and drag me into the story so much easier and kept me hooked. The simplicity of how this all worked so well together and how brilliantly it was written, made this an addictive read. For such a short read of under 200 pages, this book did so much to incorporate so much into such a short amount of pages. To develop the main character, his story, and to highlight what was going on in the book and going on in his mind.

While reading this book, I felt like it was a metaphor for society today and how conformity plays a part in that. How society is trying to force people, especially children from a young age in school, to conform and be raised to societal norms and what’s expected from them. How people are expected to behave a certain way, and if they don’t, then they are punished until they learn how to behave and act correctly. It could possibly have been a look how Mental Illness goes undiagnosed and mishandled. This then mixed in with the above societal conformity concept expected of people.

This book did mke me rethink about so much, which is great when a book makes you think about yourself and makes you look around you. It makes you look past the words and look deeper into the book.

It’s definitely a book that’s worth a read and the best partis, it’s part of Kindle Unlimited if you have it, you it could be a free read.

Teaser Tuesday 23/1/2018

Teaser Tuesday is a weekly meme that is currently being hosted by @Books and a Beat. All are welcome to participate😀

Rules:
●Grab your current read.

●Open to a random page.
●Share two ‘teaser’ sentences from somewhere on that page.
●BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (You don’t want to give too much away so as to not ruin the book for others!)
●Share the title and author so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR lists if they like your teasers

Murder In Little Shendon – A.H. Richardson

Page 3: “Blood flew everywhere, seeping into the dark wood of the desk and into some papers and puddling onto the floor.

Mr Bartholomew Finches, open-mouthed and eyes glazed, his hands futilely clutching at the air, slumped over the side of his chair and onto the floor… very very dead.”

Book Description:

Nobody in Little Shendon particularly liked Mr. Finches. Thereforw, when he is murdered in a rather gruesome manner, the suspect list grows quite long – and includes everyone from his housekeeper to Lady Armstrong and her household staff, the shy librarian, a feisty major, the charming post mistress, owners of the town pub, even the vicar and the pair of American tourists. To aid the investigation, Inspector Stanley Burgess calls on his old friend, Sir Victor Hazlitt, and a new friend, the noted Shakespearean actor Beresford Brandon. The three sift methodically through the alibis and life stories of the suspects until they uncover…

What are you currently reading?

The Catcher in the Rye – J.D. Salinger

I recently watched The Rebel in the Rye and after watching that film, it made me really want to reread The Catcher In The Rye, written by the one and only J.D. Salinger. Watching this film opened my eyes to the author and his life and how he came about and wrote this book. It made me want to reread and see if I could notice certain things, knowing what I didn’t know the first time I read the book.

Rereading this book for the second time around was a lot better for me, than the first time. I got to understand Holden better this time around and I got to take in a lot more as well. I got to pick out things that I missed, or I got to understand certain things a lot better than I did the first time I read this book, as I was a lot younger a d wasn’t as mature. I hadn’t had my own experiences in life, good or bad, and emotionally, which is a key factor with this book to possibly understanding the main character, which is why I think I got something completely different out of this book this time around. You get to see glimpses into what he’s thinking, and how he was feeling. I don’t think I misunderstood him rereading it or thought of him as miserable. He came across as lost with some teenage angst thrown in. Not understanding where you fit in in this world and where your future is going. Not understanding himself maybe.

The story is about this boy named Holden, who gets kicked out of yet another school. This is his story, told in his words; from why he starts the story where he does and includes what he includes. I don’t want to give too much away about what happens, because then you can be surprised and enjoyed the story for yourselves, without any spoilers.

This is a book that I do highly recommend to everybody, as it is a must read. It can be and get a little repetitive at times, but it’s still a very good read.